Author Topic: Dual vs single yokes  (Read 2585 times)

Wayne Sharp

  • ABS Member
  • Full Member
  • Posts: 11
Dual vs single yokes
« on: April 04, 2010, 05:10:46 AM »
I'm sure somewhere on this site is a discussion about single and dual yokes but I haven't found it so here is my questions:



I have 3 questions about conducting flight instruction in Barons, two of which are related to throwover yokes and 1 general.

1.) Can a flight review be done in a Baron with a throwover yoke if the pilot is still flight review current?

2.) Can an Instrument competency check be done in a Baron with a throwover yoke? What if the pilot is ICC current when he does the Instrument competency check? Or what if the flight is done in VFR conditions?

3.) Can an Instrument Instructor, that is rated to fly multi-engine, but not a multi-engine instructor give an instrument competency check in a multi-engine aircraft?

Tom Turner

  • ABS Member
  • Full Member
  • Posts: 900
Dual vs single yokes
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2010, 01:25:47 AM »
Hi, Wayne:

Here's the current FAA interpretation of flight flight instruction with single flight controls.  ABS also has a new podcast that explains the regulation.  The FAA has proposed to permit instruction in single-control airplanes without personal exemptions as part of its overhaul of Parts 61 and 91, but there is no timetable on when this change may occur.

The first link above includes contact information for locations that rent and ship dual control yokes for installation in order to conduct flight instruction.  

In summary, in multiengine airplanes it is only permissible to provide flight instruction in single-control airplanes (including Flight Reviews and IPCs) if the instructor or training provider has an exemption from the FAA.  


Wayne Sharp

  • ABS Member
  • Full Member
  • Posts: 11
Dual vs single yokes
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2010, 12:19:48 AM »
Thanks for answers.  So, I have just received my FAA exemption for instructing with throwover yokes, in Barons etc.

As to the third question: While I hold a CFII and MEI, no one else on field does, and I would like to be able to use a local CFII to maintain MY currency and just for good practice doing competency checks of myself. AOPA says there is a recent change to the FAA position which disallows the practice, but when I requested more info from them about the change it was not forthcoming. Anyone heard more about this?

Bruce Cameron

  • ABS Member
  • Full Member
  • Posts: 5
Re: Dual vs single yokes
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2012, 04:11:48 PM »
Hi Tom,
 Any possibility of updating your link below? Thinking that www-site re-design over past couple years is what producing the "404- Not found" msg.

Thanks, Bruce

Hi, Wayne:

Here's the current FAA interpretation of flight <a href="http://www.bonanza.org/News/?id=186" target="_blank">flight instruction with single flight controls[/url].  ABS also has a new <a href="http://www.bonanza.org/Podcasts/20100401%20-%20Flight%20Instruction%20in%20a%20Single%20Control%20Beechcraft.cfm" target="_blank">podcast[/url] that explains the regulation.  The FAA has proposed to permit instruction in single-control airplanes without personal exemptions as part of its overhaul of Parts 61 and 91, but there is no timetable on when this change may occur.

The first link above includes contact information for locations that rent and ship dual control yokes for installation in order to conduct flight instruction. 

In summary, in multiengine airplanes it is only permissible to provide flight instruction in single-control airplanes (including Flight Reviews and IPCs) if the instructor or training provider has an exemption from the FAA.

Tom Turner

  • ABS Member
  • Full Member
  • Posts: 900
Re: Dual vs single yokes
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2012, 04:48:20 PM »
Hi, Bruce:

We removed that item from the website after the change to FAR 91.109, that states that flight instruction (including Flight Reviews) may now be done in single-control airplanes.  The change became effective Oct. 31, 2011.  See 91.109 for the conditions required to conduct flight instruction in airplanes with single flight controls.