Author Topic: baron  (Read 2470 times)

Anthony Locklayer

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baron
« on: November 24, 2008, 07:57:33 AM »
Does a Baron have critical engine? And if so, what model?

Bob Lee

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baron
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2008, 12:45:31 AM »
An example of critical engine and VMC, take a look at the crash in Nashville a couple of days ago.  A Baron with engine failure spins in and kills all 3 aboard.  I'm always amazed when crashes like this occur.  Not enough training and practice practice practice with single engine procedures.  Unless a the props turn counter to each other, the critical engine usually is the port/left one.  The distance from the downward blade to the fuselage centerline determines the effect of rotation about the vertical axis.   Practice practice practice..

Bob

Scott Newpower

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baron
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2008, 07:44:50 AM »
There's no evidence yet that the Baron in Nashville lost an engine.  He never told ATC anything of the sort.

Tom Turner

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baron
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2008, 01:42:33 AM »
The pilot reported instrument failure, not engine failure, in the Nashville tragedy.  First guess: attitude indicator failure and loss of control while attempting partial panel flight.  

Mike Bland

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baron
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2008, 01:43:52 PM »
Anthony,

In all Barons, the left engine is the critical engine.

Mike Bland

Chuck Waldrop

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baron
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2008, 03:54:10 PM »
Sounds like the Baron in Nashville may have been in a flat spin.I have read the flat spin in the Baron may not be recoverable. I am wondering what would be the best technic to use. If you can't stop the turn with the rudder should asymmetric power be used.

Chuck Waldrop

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Dan Ramirez

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baron
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2008, 01:20:51 PM »
TRAIN....PRACTICE, TRAIN...PRACTICE, TRAIN.....PRACTICE!

Dan Ramirez BPPP CFI,MEI

David Aumack

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baron
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2009, 10:40:47 PM »
The Nashville Baron was only 3 miles out...that puts him around 1000'.  That is not enough altitude to recover from a unusual nose-low attitude, let alone departure from controlled flight.  The engines' operating status has not been released so there is no reason to draw any conclusions in that regard.  

During any instrument failure, one can expect a degrade in situational awareness - something we all must fight, especially during IMC.

As far as a critical engine, both the Baron 55 and 58 have the left engine as critical.  

But thrust alone does not make one engine "critical" for myself.  In several Apaches I've flown, the left engine also contained the only hydraulic pump, so loss of the left engine meant not only flying was a pain, but lowering the gear took 52 pumps - alot for a quick return in the pattern.

What drove, no inspired me to fly a twin was not the extra engine (although it is nice over the mountains) was the extra alternator/vacuum pump that is spinning on the other wing.  Those are handy at night.