Author Topic: airwolf oil scavengers  (Read 652 times)

Pete Lane

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airwolf oil scavengers
« on: July 15, 2011, 06:41:02 AM »
I have been considering installing the airwolf oil separators/scavengers on my C-55 Baron.  I am convinced that most of my oil consumption is blowby and it is all over the underside of the airplane. Does anyone have any experience with these on the Baron?  I had one on a Debonair I had a long time ago and it worked well, but I dont see how it will fit into the spaces between the back of the engine and the firewall.

Does anyone have any idea as to how many hours it takes or what the installation costs are too?  Oil is pretty cheap in relative terms but I get tired of looking at the oil on the back of the flap and my wife gets annoyed with the oil mark she gets on her pants when she forgets it may be oily back there.

Pete Lane

Harvey Kriegsman

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airwolf oil scavengers
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2011, 06:30:00 AM »
I'm not sure, but I don't ever recall seeing an STC for a Baron, any model.

Ronald Hays

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airwolf oil scavengers
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2011, 08:35:55 AM »
I think the M-20 Air/Oil Separators for crankcase breathers sold by Aircraft Spruce are STC'd. Check the location for installation carefully though.

RH

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Don Lawrenz

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airwolf oil scavengers
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2011, 11:32:04 PM »
Hi Pete

Sounds like you prefer to treat the symptom rather than cure the problem. Have you done anything to determine why you are getting excessive flow (and oil) through the breather line (nose seal, verified actual leakage past the rings on a compression test, replaced the oil filler cap gasket, etc) ?

Lewis Gage

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Re: airwolf oil scavengers
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2012, 12:32:16 PM »
Compression tests are not a good method to determine how well the rings are sealing the piston to the cylinder when the engine is running. Gross failure of the rings or piston will show up on a compression check, but a more or less normal engine compression check only tells what might be happening with the valves, barrel to head joint and cracks in the head. Everything changes with the rings when the engine goes from the static state of a compression check to the dynamic state while running.

Regards,  Lew Gage