Author Topic: FLYING LESSONS for May 21, 2009  (Read 587 times)

Tom Turner

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FLYING LESSONS for May 21, 2009
« on: May 20, 2009, 02:31:00 PM »

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style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">For much more on flying safely see
color=#800080>www.thomaspturner.net.style="mso-spacerun: yes"> 


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style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">©2009 = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Mastery Flight
Training
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reserved


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LESSONS
style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> for Year="2009" Day="21" Month="5" ls="trans">style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">May 21, 2009style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">


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reports


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style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">FLYING LESSONS style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">uses the past week’s mishap reports
as the jumping-off point to consider what style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">might have contributed to accidents, so
you can make better decisions if you face similar circumstances.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  In almost all cases design
characteristics of a specific make and model airplane have little direct bearing
on the possible causes of aircraft accidents, so apply these style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">FLYING LESSONS to any airplane you
fly.  Verify all technical
information before applying it to your aircraft or operation, with
manufacturers’ data and recommendations taking precedence. style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">style="mso-spacerun: yes"> style="mso-spacerun: yes">  


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style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Feel free to forward this message for
the purpose of pilot education.  style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">FLYING LESSONS is also available in PDF
through a link in the left column at href="http://www.thomaspturner.net/">color=#800080>www.thomaspturner.net.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  If you wish to stop receiving style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">FLYING LESSONS email “unsubscribe” to href="mailto:mastery.flight.training@cox.net">mastery.flight.training@cox.net.style="mso-spacerun: yes"> 


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align=center>style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">FLYING LESSONS style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">is an independent product of
Mastery
Flight Training
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style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt; COLOR: red; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">FLYING
LESSONS
size=3> style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: red; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">is href="http://www.faasafety.gov/gslac/ALC/lib_categoryview.aspx?categoryId=21">featured
on the FAA’s safety website! 


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">See href="http://www.faasafety.gov/gslac/ALC/lib_categoryview.aspx?categoryId=21">style="COLOR: windowtext">www.faasafety.gov/gslac/ALC/lib_categoryview.aspx?categoryId=21.


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style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 18pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">This week’s
lessons:


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt">There’s a
reason
most
airplanes carry a legally binding limitation that at least some minimum amount
of fuel must be in each main tank for
takeoff.  It’s to protect pilots and
their passengers in the event the wrong tank is inadvertently selected, and to
provide an alternate source if for any reason the selected tank does not deliver
combustible fuel. 


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style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt">The pilot
who feels him/herself “smarter”
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">than the POH may unexpectedly find
him/herself in exactly the rare situation that caused the limitation to be
imposed in the first place.


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style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt">Experience
is what
happens to you. 
style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt">Training
is learning
from the experiences of others. 
Much of our training involves identifying and complying with the
limitations placed on the airplane by the Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH) or
Approved Flight Manual (AFM). 
Remember that these limitations (which carry the force of law) are almost
universally written as a result a mishap—they are not style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">proactive, but instead style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">reactive to the circumstances of an
accident.


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style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt">Sometimes
even good pilots make a bad decision. 
One frequent example
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">is what I call the “airshow pass,”
an impromptu low altitude/high speed pass, followed by a steep climbing
turn.  There is a crash, on average,
out of one attempted airshow pass every week in the United States, half of those
fatal—clustered, logically, on weekends in the nicer flying months.style="mso-spacerun: yes"> 


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style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt">Although the
amateur airshow pass
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> is usually flown at local fly-ins
and pancake breakfasts, it is often an exhibitionist display in front of friends
or family—who tragically at times have a front-row view to the pilot’s final
flight.  It’s even more tragic, if
not homicidal, when the pilot takes unwitting passengers on this often-fatal
flight.


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style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt">It’s
certainly one valid regulatory interpretation
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">that, since this low-altitude flight
is not necessary for takeoff or landing, that the airshow pass is a violation of
regulations concerning minimum flight altitudes and potentially the requirements
for distance from people and structures. 
Others contend that the maneuver is legal, pointing to the many FAA
employees who attend airshows and witness these displays without comment (and
even enjoying them).  More so,
military and aerobatic pilots warn of the danger of “rolling Gs”.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Read about the hazards, and
considerations for safety, in my article “href="http://www.ipilot.com/learn/article.aspx?ArticleID=258">The Airshow Pass:
Having Fun Without Getting Killed
”. 
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style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt">See href="http://www.ipilot.com/learn/article.aspx?ArticleID=258">www.ipilot.com/learn/article.aspx?ArticleID=258.


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style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Questions?style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Comments?style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Email me at href="mailto:mastery.flight.training@cox.net">mastery.flight.training@cox.net


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style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Thanks to everyone who attended
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Mastery Flight
Training
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">’s seminar “What Really Happens in
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">IMCstyle="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">” last week in Columbus, Ohio, and
“The First 60 Seconds: Performance in Transition” at the annual Sporty’s Pilot
Shop fly-in at Batavia, OH.  
Thank you Sporty’s Pilot Shop and BPPP, Inc. for hosting these
events.


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 18pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 18pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">QUESTIONS OF THE
WEEK
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style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt">One
randomly selected reader in May will win his/her choice of a
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt">Mastery
Flight Training
style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt"> hat
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt">or the
MFT
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt">DVDstyle="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt"> style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">Those Who Won’t: 10 Tips for Avoiding
Landing Gear Mishaps
.  Your
email address goes in the drawing once every week you respond to a
question.  All responses will remain
confidential, but I will publish a review of the results.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Like PIREPs, this works best if style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">everyone participates.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  So take a moment to answer this week’s
question… then come back to read the rest of style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">FLYING LESSONS.


style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt">size=3> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt">May Question
of the Week #3


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">What
visual flying skill do you feel your initial Private Pilot training left you
woefully inadequate to perform?  How
did you overcome this deficiency? 
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">Copy
and paste the question with your response to href="mailto:MFTsurvey@cox.net">MFTsurvey@cox.net.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Thanks, and good luck!style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt"> 


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt">May
Question of the Week #2 Response: 
Several readers related situations when they confronted a pilot who was
“an accident waiting to happen.” 
Here are some highlights:


style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">When
I was going through
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">
some advanced pilot training there were a lot of kids wanting to fly for a
living and setting out to prove that they were capable.  Our class wasn't
yet IFR rated but one fellow thought he could brave the elements and try
it.  Being fresh from the police dept as a
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">NJ
street
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cop, I wasted no words expressing to him that it was not a good idea.  He
agreed and after about 5 minutes we waited out one of the biggest
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">Texasstyle="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">
thunderstorms I've ever encountered.
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style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-pagination: none; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">Yes,
I've had that unpleasant experience.
style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">We
had a skydive operation
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">
going at the airport.  The sky divers themselves were pretty fast and loose
- one or two bounced off the hangars on landing for example.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">However,
what got me to step up was simple: a King Air 90, making a high speed pass in
the opposite direction of the pattern.  The pass was slightly above the
height of the rotating beacon. Never mind the wingover that the King Air pilot
did as he tried to beat the skydivers to the ground. The airport in question is
frequented by a variety of aircraft, including ultralights.  The pilot put
himself, his sightseeing passenger, and the other pilots at risk through his
maneuver.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">When
I met up with him, I asked him what he thought he was doing.  He responded
that he "was trying to give his passenger a good ride, and didn't mean any
harm.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">I
pointed out the various local traffic, that he had violated the regulations for
following the traffic pattern, for traffic pattern speeds, and for general
safety, and that by doing so, he had put everyone in jeopardy.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">Fortunately,
the skydive operation has moved elsewhere, but this guy was an award
winner.  How you can develop that kind of attitude is amazing.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 6pt; TEXT-INDENT: 0.25in; mso-pagination: none; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Courier TU'">I
encountered one of these, a few years ago. Really a nice guy, but had been
flying too long without any instruction or feedback from others on his abilities
and techniques. He was borderline "safe", but if something out of the ordinary
would happen, he'd be in trouble. His biggest issue was that he didn't have
situational control. He altitudes and airspeed control was horrible. He'd come
into the airport area 5000 feet high and descent way into the yellow to get
down. And then he wasn't sure where the airport was... didn't navigate well. A
really good review and perhaps a few simple lessons would have done him a world
of difference, which I carefully suggested (at the right time). Well, he agreed,
and we had plenty of well-qualified instructors in the area. Unfortunately, he
died before he got the instruction.... not that it would have made a difference,
as he died of natural causes.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-pagination: none; mso-layout-grid-align: none">face="Times New Roman">style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt">This happened 20+ years ago
now,
but
this culture can still exist in any size operation, airline, flight school or
office.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt">We had been purchased, merged
with, or taken over (you pick) by the predominant carrier in the East.  The
airline that I had been with had a very strong training environment that
stressed
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt">CRMstyle="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt"> and a company culture that
expected that each crew member was responsible to maintain the safety of the
flight and to work together to ensure the optimum conclusion of the flight.
 In a few months our routes and domiciles changed, our seniority merged and
many new faces began to occupy the seat next to you. It was quickly evident that
this carrier’s culture was very different from our old.   There was no
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt">CRMstyle="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt"> or joint operation here; it
was the simply what ever the Captain wanted.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt">Since I was a senior F/O on
the MD80 I had picked up an excellent four day trip that pared me with one of
the most senior pilots at the airline.  He showed up in a surly mood and as
the day wore on it got progressively worse; and his procedures were very
non-standard for the ’80.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-INDENT: 0.5in; mso-pagination: none; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt">face="Times New Roman">The next day things were no better. By the third day,
after watching him attempt to do short field landings with the ’80 and giving me
close to heart failure I was able to talk to him in a quiet area.  I asked
what was troubling him, was there something amiss with me or ?  First he
rebuffed me rudely and then went into a rant about 767 training and how they’d
busted him out and now he’s flying this glorified DC-9 and he’ll do it his way,
etc.  I listed quietly as it was apparent that there was something
seriously wrong with this gentleman. That night I thought about calling our
professional standards people but decided to hold off, after all it could just
be me.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">
face="Times New Roman">The last day was a short one with only two legs.
 The Captain came into the cockpit and announced he wanted to fly both of
them to work on his landings. I agreed and off we went. He was still
non-standard on a couple of small items, but he threw the book out the window as
we approached our first stop. We had good weather and  he reached over to
de-activate the Ground Prox and other warning CB’s as he aimed to land well
below the VASI just before the numbers on the runway!  I had challenged him
when he pulled the breakers and attempted to reset them but he pulled them again
and proceeded to land so short our tail surfaces were still over the grass when
the wheels touched.  At the gate, I read him the riot act requesting that
he not do that again. I was told to stuff it. The Senior F/A (a private pilot)
came up into the cockpit to inquire if something was wrong. She left quickly
when the Captain turned his temper against her.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-INDENT: 0.5in; mso-pagination: none; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt">face="Times New Roman">I cannot properly relate the angst I felt as we headed
back to our domicile. Indeed as we approached the airport, he was pulling CB’s
again and I was resetting them. Twice I demanded that he allow me to fly the
approach. He would not. Our landing was just what he wanted, with the main gear
touching down probably 500 feet before the numbers. Over the tower
frequency a gasp was heard from one of our company flights holding short of the
runway.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">
face="Times New Roman">When we got to the gate I tried to pull the Captain aside
and talk but he was in a hurry to leave. The Senior F/A came out to ask again
what the ‘@#$ was going on and I related what had transpired. She then said
under her breath, “old such and such is going off his rocker again”.
  Again?
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">
face="Times New Roman">That day I spoke with a professional standards member of
our union, and was advised to go direct to the chief pilot. The meeting with the
chief pilot was not cordial, to the point I was told that since I was from the
“other” carrier I should show more respect for this airlines senior pilots,
especially if I wanted to upgrade some day. Further, if he (chief pilot) heard
of any problems with me and their Captains I could be removed from the
line.
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">
face="Times New Roman">Weeks later, one of the professional standards committee
members spoke with me. He related that I was not the only person to have
problems with Captain X but was the only one to complain in the last year.
Captain X had been taken off the line before.  From what he heard the
company had decided to retire him a year early because a check airman riding
jump seat had gotten scared.  When I asked why the Chief Pilot would cover
for Captain X like he did and why he considered me the rascal here, his reply
was, he just wanted to help out his friend; “anyway, you’re the new guy here and
you need to know your place.”
style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">style="mso-spacerun: yes">  face="Times New Roman">style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; mso-bidi-font-size: 16.0pt">Such a culture.style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt">


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt"> 


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt">Uncomfortable
situations handled with aplomb. 
Thanks to all who answered last week’s question!
style="FONT-SIZE: 16pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 18pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">DEBRIEF: style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Readers discuss past style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">FLYING LESSONS
reports


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 6pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">Commenting
on the recent FLYING LESSON on the
high number of gear-up landings reader Dan Secord writes:


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">Question:style="mso-spacerun: yes">  what would be the objection to adding
those three words to the landing clearance? style="mso-spacerun: yes"> Probably would save some
grief.


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt">face="Times New Roman"> 


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">To
which I replied:
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">I
don't know why anyone should object. 
I believe for some reason the phrase was recently eliminated from landing
clearances in
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">Canadastyle="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Maybe some of my Canadian readers can
enlighten us.  Secord
responds:


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'"> 


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; FONT-FAMILY: Times; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">There
lots of stuff that could be done: 
"idiot lights" like virtually every automobile in captivity when your
alternator goes belly up, or you're down to 4 gallons of fuel. I remember one
trip years ago, when the controller announced that my alternator was down and to
land immediately just because the radio power was fading (and I hadn't looked at
the ammeter).


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'"> 


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">Thanks,
Dan.  Cockpit technology is trending
toward “hazard monitoring,” i.e., indications that display only when there are
abnormalities, sometimes called “idiot lights.”style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Knowledgeable pilots monitoring
informative cockpit displays is still preferred, for everything from landing
gear deployment to electrical monitoring and beyond.


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt">face="Times New Roman"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 18.0pt"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 18pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">For piston Beech
pilots
style="FONT-SIZE: 18pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">The
style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">May 20,
2009
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> Weekly Accident Update
style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> is now posted at href="http://www.thomaspturner.net/">color=#800080>www.thomaspturner.netstyle="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">, including these
reports:


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 6pt 0.5in; TEXT-INDENT: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol">style="mso-list: Ignore">·style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman'">        
A 58TC
veered off the runway on landing….


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 6pt 0.5in; TEXT-INDENT: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol">style="mso-list: Ignore">·style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman'">        
A P35
landed gear up….


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 6pt 0.5in; TEXT-INDENT: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol">style="mso-list: Ignore">·style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman'">        
Two
aboard an A36 died after the Bonanza’s engine failed….


style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 6pt 0.5in; TEXT-INDENT: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol">style="mso-list: Ignore">·style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman'">        
A C35’s
nose gear collapsed during takeoff….


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> 


style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">There are
also NTSB reports on the C33 engine failure on takeoff at
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">Addisonstyle="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">,
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">TX
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">, and the
Baron maneuvering crash that killed five at
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">Mindenstyle="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">,
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">NV
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 8.0pt">.


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 10.0pt"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">For more information, commentary and
analysis see the Beech Weekly Accident Update link at href="http://www.thomaspturner.net/WAU%202009.htm">color=#800080>www.thomaspturner.net/WAU 2009.htm.
style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt"> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">size=3> 


style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">size=3>Fly safe, and have fun!


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> 


style="FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Thomas P. Turner, M.S. Aviation
Safety MCFI


style="FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">2008 FAA Central Region Flight
Instructor of the Year


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> 


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">I welcome your comments and
suggestions.  Contact href="mailto:mastery.flight.training@cox.net">mastery.flight.training@cox.net.


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> 


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">If someone has forwarded this message
to you and you want to have FLYING
LESSONS
sent directly to you each week, href="mailto:mastery.flight.training@cox.net">tell me.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  If you received this message directly
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style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">©2009 style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Mastery Flight
Training
style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">, Inc.style="mso-spacerun: yes">  All rights
reserved.


style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> 


src="cid:750035402@21052009-170F" width=65 align=left
v:shapes="_x0000_s1029">Holder
of an ATP certificate with instructor, CFII and MEI ratings and a Masters Degree
in Aviation Safety, and 2008
style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">FAA Central Region
style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">CFIstyle="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> of the Yearstyle="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">, Master
style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">CFIstyle="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> Thomas P. Turner has been Lead
Instructor for FlightSafety International's Bonanza pilot training program at
the Beechcraft factory; production test pilot for engine modifications; aviation
insurance underwriter; corporate pilot and safety expert; Captain in the United
States Air Force; and contract course developer for Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University.  He now manages education and technical services for a
10,000-member pilot’s organization.  With over 3600 hours logged, including
more than 2200 as an instructor, Tom writes, lectures and instructs extensively
from his home at THE
style="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">AIRstyle="FONT-SIZE: 8pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> CAPITAL--Wichita,
Kansas.
style="mso-spacerun: yes"> 


href="http://www.thomaspturner.net/">