Author Topic: About EFB computers  (Read 4811 times)

Alan Leiwant

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About EFB computers
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2010, 11:38:55 PM »
Sorry to take so long to get back to this discussion.  I use an IGO power supply that's rated for 12 to 33 volts dc.  Lind also makes a brick that is rated in that range.  The advantage of the Igo is that I can take multiple tips with me and power multiple devices on a trip.

Larry Olson

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About EFB computers
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2010, 05:43:25 AM »
 
Quote from: Juan Del Azar
After posting this conversation, and trying many different options, this is what works for me (Europe based G1000 ac)

a) Backup: a G496 which it is always on and in a complete electrical failure should provide immediate information. After facing a difficult situation, I would say that in a real emergency, the chance of looking for equipment around the cockpit would have a high correlation to losing control of the airplane. So the 496 is right seat yoke mounted and always working for you.

b) Flight planning, WX, plates, etc : A $370 Toshiba netbook which is able to run Jeppessen Software, and has a 12 hr battery. It can also be used in flight should you need an unexpected plate you did not carry onboard. Should Jeppessen decide to face reality and program Mac code, the Ipad would be hard to match.


Juan,

Your goals are a bit confusing... are you looking for a back up to fly the plane with, or just a back up for the data... charts, plates, etc.

If you're looking to fly the plane after a total electrical failure, I'd use the standby "steam" gauges that would be right in front of me. For nav, the 496 would be fine and would save the day.

Now, for the charts and plates, my choice would be the IPad, but not sure what's available for your area. There's already two vendors in the US and that will probably increase. I'm headed to my IPad store as soon as I can find them in stock.

For now, I use an old Motion 1300, Windows computer, which has been just OK, but has the potential of high failure with Windows. It failed on a recent trip out west, however, I have enough redundancy in the panel to finish the job safely, including a 396.

Once I get the Windows operating system out of the cockpit, I'll be happy.... heading that way fast.

Robin Hill

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About EFB computers
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2010, 05:41:10 AM »
AnywhereMap (www.anywheremap.com) has a Solid State Drive with the Atom processor called the "DUO" (no altitude limitations).  It probably has the most features and least expensive updates (including geo-referenced approach plates with XM WX and terrain) for the money.  I have been using their system for years.  I know alot of people love their Garmin, but their approach plate is just a viewer and their updates...$$$$.

Joseph Pavela

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About EFB computers
« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2010, 02:22:48 AM »
Andrew,

Lind Electronics sells power supplies for your table computer. I use one of their products in my 58 Baron (24V system) to power my LS800 tablet computer (running Flight Prep Electronic Charts) and my Weather Worx weather receiver. Click on the link below.

<http://www.lindelectronics.com/>

Tom Nelson

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About EFB computers
« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2010, 03:59:32 AM »
Robin I have the new anywhere Map Duo and it is feature rich but it is totaly unviewable in dailight in my cockpit what have you done to correct this.