Author Topic: Cockpit Tools: Reader plates  (Read 3753 times)

Stephen Blythe

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« on: July 03, 2009, 01:07:22 PM »
Ever tried a cross country and purchased hundreds of $ of charts and then never used them and then thru them away 30 days later?

This may be a solution for you.

I have been using an EFB for 4 years but while I still carry it I use the Sony Book reader now.  First is a Book reader, which gives you something to read waiting for weather or on one of thse long flights at 16,500.  But Now it keeps all the Airport Directopry information and All the IFR Plates. They update monthly so you are always current. And it only weighs a few oz's.  The Sony one has a good interface and is very usuable.  For 10 bucks it worth a try.

Sony Reader Plates:  Sony Reader US Instrument Charts and Airport Directory in a PDF Format $9.95/Mo

http://readerplates.com/



Kindle Reader Plates: Kindle Reader US Instrument Charts and Airport Directory in a PDF Format $Free (But not Indexed)

http://www.pdfplates.com/


Tom Pelz

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2009, 12:46:23 PM »
Steve,

Great idea.  However, I am not pleased with the effect of temperature on computers.  Specifically, I am not happy to find that the device fails to function well when I start it up when the temp is 5 degrees F in the cabin.

I do not want to have to take the stuff home.

Nor do I want the internal battery to die between flights.  I had a windows based palm device with Anywhere Map in it.   I made a trip.  At my destination, I was there a week. When I attempted to boot the device, it was dead.  The battery only lasted about 4 days.  The internal backup battery also died.  Everything was gone.   

Problem number two.  Is it mountable on the control column?   Does it also permit remote data to be used.  IE, I do not want more wires in my cabin.  I want my G430 to communicate with the device so I know where I am on my flight plan and where I am on my approach.

Currently, I use Air Chart system, which has served me well for over 20 years.  

Note, I don't dislike new technology, I just don't like it when the stuff craps out on me.

Also, I don't like a cluttered cockpit.  Using the EFB, I would be able to eliminate a moving map device, but I would only do so with something which is an improvement.

I also do not want to have to make sure I have not forgotten it at home.

IF I have to update it, I can do that at the airport with my laptop which I almost always have with me.  

Finally, I do not want to have to hold it.  I want my charts in a fixed location during flight so I do not have to use my hands to hold them.  Nor do I want to have to look around to find the approach plate.  I want to be able to find it where I expect it on any approach.

Show me a photo of your set up.



TomTom Pelz2009-08-07 03:34:47

Paul Hekman

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2009, 04:01:21 AM »
There is an extended discussion of using the Sony unit over on beech talk.  Consensus is that it works if you like it.  Personally, I think the screen is too small to be reading while bouncing around in IMC.

Lorne Sheren

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2009, 01:12:54 PM »
Try SolidFX.com, they have a Jepp-supported reader at around $1600.

Lorne Sheren

Don Mosier

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2010, 11:29:12 AM »
Check out the AV8OR ACE.  You get georeferenced NACO charts from Seattle avionics at a reasonable annual subscription.  For about $2200, you can get it with XM weather as well.  I found the best deal at Sarasota Avionics, ask for Bill Snead.  I like the product better than the Garmin 496 and 696, both of which I've owned.  The 696 is a) too expensive, b) not georeferenced, c) subscriptions cost way too much.  

Tom Pelz

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2010, 03:09:20 PM »
This is a follow up of my use of the Amazon Kindle DX with the Reader Plate products.

The Kindle works fine even with the temp at 2 degrees F above zero.

The plates are still visible and readable at that temperature.

I have the Kindle mounted on my Autel Plate Holder.   I did have to make a new holder which replaces the original holder.  The Kindle then mounts easily and is in my panel scan without undo attention.



I have found that the Kindle's battery is still fully charged even after a few weeks inactivity.   

I have used it on flights from Wisconsin to Tampa with stops at TLH.  No problems with lack of battery life, etc.

I look forward to having more passenger foot room with the ability to eliminate the bulky flight bag.  

Thus far I am pleased.   A year from now, I will advise again how pleased / displeased I am with the Kindle and Reader Plates.

Tom

Paul Lilly

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2010, 02:56:10 AM »
Hi Stephen and Tom,

Thanks for the link to the PDF Plates!

I got a Kindle from my kids on Fathers day as I tend to read a lot of books. After I started playing with it I say I could load PDF files. I didn't realize you could download them as a set. I am going to try them. I am curious how easy or hard it is to scroll through and find the one you want.

I agree the battery lasts a long time on the Kindle, as long as you turn off the wireless function. And the display is easy to read.

For those that are not familiar with it, for the big screen size, it is much thinner and lighter than what you might expect.

I am quite happy with it as a book reader, and will consider it awesome if it will double in the plane.


Tom Pelz

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2010, 03:05:46 AM »
This is an update on my use of the Kindle with Reader Plates.

Yesterday, I was on a flight from Tampa to Wisconsin.  There was significant time to play with the Kindle during the first part of the flight (IFR flight plan in VFR weather).  

I am getting used to the device.  Even when you forget to push a button to keep it active, moving the slider quickly brought you back to the spot you were at.   

It is also easy to select different charts of an airport.  When I landed at TPA, I pushed the previous page button a couple of times and got to the Airport diagram.  I found this much easier than having to unfasten the chart book from my approach plate holder and then try to find the correct page, then put it back on the approach plate holder so I would not drop it on the floor while I am taxiing around a big airport and trying to act like I know what I am doing..

Then, while I am headed back to Wisconsin, began to become more comfortable with the Kindle as I pretended that I was going to have to land at various airports along the way.

All and all, I am more than happy with the Kindle and the Reader Plates.   

OH, I had the device on for more than 10 hours.  When I landed last night, I observed that I had would guess that there was more than 70 percent charge remaining.  During normal use, I do have the Kindle's communication component turned off.

Tom

Andrew Birrell

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Cockpit Tools: Reader plates
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2010, 10:46:46 PM »
Can one get PDF's of non US plates as well? For example, I need plates for Europe and Africa.