Author Topic: FAA to Begin Rulemaking for Third Class Medical Exemption  (Read 318 times)

Tom Turner

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FAA to Begin Rulemaking for Third Class Medical Exemption
« on: April 03, 2014, 08:54:48 AM »
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration will move forward with the rulemaking process regarding the elimination of the third class medical certificate requirement for many non-commercial pilots.
AOPA reports the FAA has responded positively to the petition it and the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) submitted in 2012, requesting action on exempting certain non-commercial pilots from the FAA Third Class medical certificate requirement.

When the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) is released ABS will ask members to take a poll to let us know your opinion about how we should comment.

http://www.aopa.org/News-and-Video/All-News/2014/April/02/FAA-announces-rulemaking-on-third-class-medical.aspx?CMP=ADV:1

Michael Friel

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Re: FAA to Begin Rulemaking for Third Class Medical Exemption
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2014, 08:04:16 AM »
It will be interesting to see where this leads.  I suspect the initial ruling, if any, will be limited.  Eventually I would hope to see pilots flying non commercial flights day, night, VFR and IFR in all of the Beechcraft piston aircraft without the need for a third class medical.  For now I'm happy to see movement on the issue, it's a step in the right direction.

Michael McNamara

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Re: FAA to Begin Rulemaking for Third Class Medical Exemption
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2014, 07:05:52 PM »
I want to travel in my Debonair, IFR, VFR, night, anywhere I can go now without a medical.

Tom Turner

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Re: FAA to Begin Rulemaking for Third Class Medical Exemption
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2014, 08:33:12 AM »
I brought up the issue to IFR operations under this proposed exemption in an AOPA Town Hall meeting in Lansing, Michigan last January.  Reports from the recent AOPA Fly-In at San Marcos, Texas, are that this was brought up in the town hall meeting there also.  AOPA's stance is that the exemption needs to "start small" (i.e., VFR only) and then hopefully expand to IFR operations later after data exists to show no change in the accident rate.  The proposed exemption calls for a five-year data collection period and then an evaluation, so presumably AOPA plans to wait five years before pursuing the IFR expansion--assuming, of course, that the VFR exemption goes through.

ABS will continue to push for inclusion of noncommercial IFR operations from the beginning.  If/when a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking is published, we will call for this inclusion in our comments to the proposed rule.